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organic definitions

Did you know there are many ways to hide chemicals and toxic ingredients. We will list these ways and the references for the data. 10% of ingredients do not have to be listed. 
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For your information here are the definitions for labeling a product in the United States:


Labels on organic and natural beauty products can be very deceptive. In the United States, there is little regulation of advertising products with the term "natural."

  

 

 

 

This means that a product   with a low percentage of natural ingredients can still be advertised as "natural."  


It also means products with natural, organically grown ingredients in them can also contain unhealthy, undesireable, man made chemicals.

 

 

A product is considered "natural" when it contains ingredients that are sourced from nature rather than created synthetically. Natural products generally don't include ingredients like petrochemicals, parabens, sodium lauryl and laureth sulfates, phthalates, synthetic dyes and synthetic colors like PPD or PTD.  Now everyone knows this right?  It is a no brainer that natural means the paragraph above, organic also fits into this description-  as well as being a plant that is grown in an organic way.



  Cosmetic labeling RULES:

You will find most companies DO NOT EVEN ADHERE TO THESE RULES....BUT BY NOW THEY REALLY SHOULD.  SOME NEW COMPANIES WHO NEVER MADE OR PREVIOUSLY SOLD ORGANIC PRODUCTS, ARE ADVERTISING THEIR NEW BRAND AS  BEING  ORGANIC haircolor, UNDER ORGANIC KEYWORDS.   MADISON REED IS ONE.  THEY ARE NOT IN ANY WAY ORGANIC. SO DON'T LET THEM FOOL YOU.  THIS IS A TRICK AND IS NOT RIGHT. 


R U L E S:

 Products with 70% or greater organic composition can be labeled "Made With Organic Ingredients" This means that products claiming they're made with organic ingredients could also potentially contain harmful synthetic ingredients.
 

  Complicating the matter are independent certification organizations, such as Ecocert and NSF, that create their own standards to which companies may comply.

The terms "vegan" and "cruelty-free" are not linked to or synonymous to "natural" or "organic," though there is often some overlap. Vegan is the term used to describe cosmetics free of animal products. Vegan cosmetic brands are also cruelty-free,
but it is possible a vegan product could be composed of synthetic preservatives and therefore not be"natural." Cruelty-free products-- or those that have not been tested on animals-- are not necessarily vegan, organic, or natural.
A number of the big name drugstore and high-end cosmetic companies are cruelty-free, but their products are usually comprised mostly of synthetic ingredients.

An organic ingredient is by definition natural, and vegan cosmetic products are NOT necessarily cruelty-free. Aside from that,
products may be labeled natural, vegan, or cruelty-free without bearing the qualities of the others.
 

 

 

 

The bottom line?
  When shopping for natural and organic beauty products, DON’T take advertising claims at face value. Remember that product packaging and advertising
may be worded deliberately to mislead you into thinking you are purchasing something you are not.   Additionally, advertisers can legally make claims that their product does this or that and it does not have to be true.  This last bit of information really shocked me.




 

YOU MAY WANT TO RESEARCH THE SAFETY OF YOUR COSMETIC you are paying good money for.     

100% Organic:   For this claim, 100% of the ingredients in the product must be certified organic products and in this case, the USDA Organic seal may be used. (Notation: This seal COSTS ALOT TO APPLY FOR, OBTAIN AND USE. you must have alot of money to obtain this seal in order to use it, which is the down side to this and is kind of mercinary).

 

Organic:   To make this claim, 95% of the materials in the product must be certified organic products; the same USDA Organic seal may be used in this instance.

Made with organic ingredients:   For this label claim, 70% to 94.99% of the product’s ingredients must be certified organic; in this case, use of the USDA Organic seal is not permitted.

Contains organic:   This label claim requires less than 70% of certified organic ingredients in a product and also   cannot bear the USDA Organic seal.

Natural Products Association (NPA, United States): This organization was founded in 1936 and was principally concerned with dietary supplements. The group represents more than 10,000 retailers, manufacturers, wholesalers and distributors of natural products, including foods, dietary supplements, and health and beauty aids.

On May 1, 2008, the group issued its certification program for personal care products. In order to display the NPA seal a product must meet the following requirements:

Contain at least 95% truly natural ingredients or ingredients that are derived from natural sources;

Contain no ingredients linked with potentially suspected human health risks;

Not be processed in ways that significantly or adversely alter the purity of its natural ingredients; Include ingredients derived from a purposeful, renewable/plentiful source found in nature (flora, fauna, mineral);

Be minimally processed and avoid the use of synthetic or harsh chemicals so as not to dilute the material’s purity; and

Should contain non-natural ingredients only where viable natural alternative ingredients are unavailable, and only when they pose absolutely no potentially suspected human health risks.

The Natural Products Association also has published a list including 839 ingredients that it considers meets these requirements.

 

Cosmetics Organic and Natural Standard (COSMOS, EU): As noted above, COSMOS is an independent effort in the EU, with its draft published in November 2008. This standard was developed from collaborations between working groups including: the Instituto per la Certificazione Etica e Ambientale (ICEA in Italy); the Federation of German Industries and Trading Firms for Pharmaceuticals, Health Care Goods, Dietary Supplements and Personal Hygiene products (BDIH in Germany); Bioforum in Belgium; the French Professional Association of the Ecological and Organic Cosmetics, and a French certification organization (Cosmebio/Ecocert in France); and an environmental charity promoting sustainable, organic farming and championing human health (The Soil Association in the UK).


Product labels that state: May or May Not Contain:  This or that ingredient.  This is denoted for ingredients containing 10% or less in the amount of any ingredient listed under this category on the label.


NOTATION ON COSMETICS AND HAIRCOLOR:

REGARDING MANUFACTURERING BRAND PRODUCT BENEFIT CLAIMS:
I WAS TOTALLY SHOCKLED TO HEAR - THAT YOU DON'T HAVE TO...PROVE THAT YOUR PRODUCT DOES WHAT YOU SAY IT DOES IN YOUR ADVERTISEMENTS.
 HEY NO WONDER ALL THE PRODUCTS I BOUGHT THAT  NEVER WORKED  NEVER WORKED....GET IT.. THEY CAN PROMISE YOU ANYTHING  AND IF IT WORKS IT IS GOOD FOR THAT COMPANY.  BUT IT DOES NOT HAVE TO......

Shocker no. 2: Did you know 10 percent of a product you don't have to list the ingredients of.  
Did you know you can cosmetic makers can HIDE  INGREDIENTS IN THE WORD " FRAGRANCE".

AS WELL AS SOME OTHER SNEAKY TRICKS.  THE COSMETIC INDUSTRY IS VERY BIG   AND EVERYONE WANTS TO GET INTO THE natural and organic, vegan, just better for you hair color, gluten free act.

 GREENWASHING AND COPY CATS, STEALING OF CREATIVE ORIGINAL IDEAS, Copywrites, naming ideas, formulas, Website material and language.  NOW DAYS - IT IS A DIRTY DOG  BUSINESS.
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My past experience:

Before 2014, As a rule, I have found that most NATURAL and ORGANIC BUSINESSES are GOOD FOLK, READY TO HELP EACH OTHER, THEY DON'T STEAL FROM EACH OTHER AND WILL IDENTIFY THEMSELVES AS CALLING TO DO RESEARCH FOR THEIR COMPANY, MOST NATURAL AND ORGANIC COMPANIES USUALLY BELIEIVE IN BEING GOOD, HONORABLE, CREATING KARMA AND CHANNELING THEIR OWN INNER CREATIVITY THEMSELVES (AND REALLY THRIVE IN THIS CREATIVE ENERGY) AS SUCH HIGHER THINKING IDEALS, JUST COME WITH THE TERRITORY OF CREATING WELLNESS.

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REMEMBER ON Any product you buy - It is the law now that a FULL INGREDIENTS MUST BE GIVEN.

 HERE IS WHAT YOU DO IF YOU HAVE A BAD HAIR TRIP FROM A PRODUCT OR A SALON:

How to Report a Problem

 

 

 

If you have a reaction to a hair dye—or any other cosmetic—first contact your health care provider for any necessary medical help.

 

 

 

Then, please tell FDA. The law doesn’t require cosmetic companies, including hair dye manufacturers, to share their safety data or consumer complaints with FDA. So, the information you report is very important to help FDA monitor the safety of cosmetics on the market.

 

 

 

 

You can report a problem with a cosmetic to FDA in either of these ways:

  1. 1.   Contact MedWatch, FDA’s problem-reporting program, at 1-800-332-1088, or file a MedWatch Voluntary  report online
  2.  
  3. 2.    Contact the consumer complaint coordinator in your area.

 


To learn more, see

Adverse Event Reporting: How to Report a Cosmetic-related Problem to FDA

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